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Short Subjects Screening at Cinecon 53

Revised August 25, 2017

We have so many one- and two-reel short subject films on our schedule that we decided to give them their own page. And in addition to our usual shorts leading into blocks of feature films we have put together a couple of all shorts programs

All films will be shown at Grauman's Egyptian Theater at 6712 Hollywood Boulevard, most in 35mm. Silent films feature live musical accompaniment. For a full list of films with screening times please check out our schedule page.

Here are some of the titles to be screened at Cinecon 53. Film notes are by Tobin Larson and Michael Schlesinger.

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THE LION, THE LAMB AND THE MAN ((1914, Rex)
Starring Lon Chaney, Murdock MacQuarrie and Pauline Bush. A recent Museum of Modern Art restoration! A quick internet search for information on this half-hour Lon Chaney drama and six websites state that this is a “lost film.” Well, New York’s Museum of Modern Art has recently found film on it and Cinecon is showing it! With Pauline Bush as The Woman, Lon Chaney as The Lion and Gus Ingles as the Lamb.

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BOYS WILL BE BOYS (1932, Universal)
Directed by George Stevens. Starring Frank Albertson, Sally Blane, Richard Carle, Guinn 'Big Boy' Williams, Fred Kelsey and Jack Duffy http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0022720/?ref_=fn_tt_tt_9 Essentially a Roach short made at Universal, this zany two-reeler is another spanking-new preservation. Showgirl Sally Blane is actually three-timing her beaus: naïve FrankAlbertson, his elderly father Richard Carle, and (uh-oh) perpetually seething mobster Big Boy Williams. Eventually all of them—and more—wind up in her dressing room, and you can anticipate the rest. This long-unseen gem is also noteworthy for a rare appearance by Fred Kelsey as not a cop!

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ROLLING ALONG (1930, Universal)
George Sidney and Charlie Murray—Cohen and Kelly in all but name—are squabbling motormen assigned to the same crosstown bus, whose passengers include an obnoxious drunk (who else but Arthur Housman?). But here’s what makes this eye-popping: After the first scene, the rest of the short is shot all along Wilshire Blvd.—priceless historic footage that includes the original Brown Derby and a theatre marquee advertising “King of Jazz!” Oh, and it’s very funny, too.

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AUTOBUYOGRAPHY (1934, Radio Pictures)
starring Leon Errol (in one of his first RKO 2-reelers), Eddie Kane, Dorthea Wolbert, Edward Keane and George Billings.

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BROOKLYN GOES TO LAS VEGAS (1956, Universal)
One of a series of comedic travelogues that deftly mocked the famed Fitzpatricks by having the narrator be a typical Brooklyn goombah—in this case, Harold Huber—but represented on-screen by a cowboy! Go figure. Anyway, the vintage Vegas footage is fun—there are slot machines everywhere—and the reel is given a boost by a bunch of stars lounging around the pool, including a certain famed comedy team. Gorgeous new 35mm print from the camera negative!

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HARE RIBBIN' (1944, Warner Bros.)
We’ll be showing a rare NITRATE print of the “Director’s cut” of this controversial cartoon. Directed by Bob Clampett, it features Bugs Bunny being chased by a red-headed, suicidal hunting dog whose voice sounds like Bert Gordon’s Mad Russian character from the Eddie Cantor radio program. This print includes the censored ending which was never released to theaters. What could be better than a nitrate IB Tech Merrie Melody? How about an ultra-rare print of the uncensored original version? It’s the usual Bugs/Elmer plot, except that in this case Mr. Fudd is replaced by a dog who speaks rather like Bert Gordon’s “Mad Russian” (and he and the wabbit both seem to function normally underwater). However, the original ending was deemed too ghastly even by cartoon standards, and it was withdrawn so a slightly tamer finale could be shot. We’re tickled to showcase this pip in the best possible manner.

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DAFFY DOC (1938, Warner Bros Cartoon)
Warner Bros recently restored a number of the black and white Porky Pig cartoons. Here's a good one, directed by the great Robert Clampett and co-starring a particularly crazed Daffy Duck.

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NO CHILDREN (1929)
One of the cleverest and funniest silent two-reelers you’ll ever see, we’re elated to finally be able to show this. Donald Haines’ folks can’t seem to find a hotel that allows kids, so Dad comes up with an ingenious ploy: He’ll claim he’s a ventriloquist—and the two boys pretend to be his dummies! Crammed with sight gags and a particularly wacky chase scene through the hotel, this knockout will leave you limp with laughter long before it’s over.

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SCHMO BOAT (2015, )
Following up our screening of IMITATION OF WIFE two years ago, we’re showing this faux 1930’s comedy short, featuring various acts set on a Mississippi paddle wheeler. With faux comedy team Biffle and Shooster preforming faux comedy and with real singing and dancing! Filmed in faux two-color Cinecolor. Writer, Producer, Director Mike Schlesinger is a Cinecon board member, otherwise you might be wondering, “What in the Biffle and Shooster take a break from their normal two-reel chaos to emcee and participate in this delightful revue, which alternates classic vaudeville routines with some dynamic musical numbers. Presented in the miracle of Cinecolor! And look for a surprise cameo by a past Cinecon honoree. world are you showing this faux?” Groan.

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TUT! TUT! KING (1923, Universal)
The kind of discovery that makes you jump up and yell “OMFG!”, this is a genuine find. From 1923-25, Universal produced a series of “Nervy Ned” one-reelers, about a hobo and his “valet” (Neely Edwards and Bert Roach) who get into all sorts of typical scrapes. Almost all were considered lost (even Steve Massa hasn’t seen this one) until this turned up at the EYE Institute and was immediately preserved. The print has Dutch intertitles, but never fear—it’s very easy to follow. The boys fleece a bunch of folks by pretending to be fountain pen repairmen. When the crowd gives chase, they duck into a museum and hide in a pair of mummy cases. Then the fun really begins!

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SHARE THE WEALTH (1936, Columbia)
One of Andy Clyde’s top Columbia comedies is as timely as today’s headlines. Running a money-losing shoe shop in a corrupt little town, he allows the local gangsters to convince him to run for mayor by railing against what we now call income inequality. He wins—and we won’t tell you what happens next, except that it’s down-right high-leerious. This was his first Columbia short opposite old Sennett pal Vernon Dent—and if they gave out Oscars for being good sports, Mary Gordon would have been a shoo-in that year.

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SPEED IN THE GAY NINETIES (1932, Sennett/Educational)
starring Andy Clyde, Helen Mann, Delmar Watson, Barney Oldfield, Bud Jamison and Heine Conklin. Don't miss this excellent 2-reeler!

As always films are listed here pending final clearance and are subject to change.

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