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Screening at Cinecon 55

Revised June 23, 2019

Cinecon is highly regarded among film fans for screening the rare and unusual films of the silent and early sound era—films that seldom get seen on a big screen. Cinecon combs the major film archives and Hollywood studio vaults to select often forgotten gems that deserve a fresh look and reappraisal. At Cinecon there is something for everyone—comedy, drama, musicals, Westerns. We show the latest restorations—and some one-of-a-kind rarities.

All films will be shown at Grauman's Egyptian Theater at 6712 Hollywood Boulevard, most in 35mm. Silent films feature live musical accompaniment. In addition to our films we will also feature several Special Programs. For a full list of films with screening times please check out our schedule page.

For the most current film information visit our facebook page.     Film notes by Tobin Larson, Motion Picture Archivist (unless otherwise noted)

   

We have film titles for Cinecon 55!

We are excited to announce some of the titles for Cinecon 55. We will be giving you more information about these films in the days to come and more films will be added to this page as they are cleared.

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CINECON 55’S OPENING NIGHT GALA PRESENTATION
Thursday night, August 29th

BARE KNEES (1928, Gotham Productions)
Preserved by The Library of Congress

It’s the 1920’s – F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “Jazz Age” - and the knees are bare because the women’s skirts are short, and their hair is bobbed. The Flappers are invading small town America! Well… one is anyway. It’s beautiful Virginia Lee Corbin. And she’s causing a panic in the town as she comes from the city to visit her staid sister for her sister’s birthday party. Her sister is a housewife and she is… boring! And the party is … boring. Until Virginia livens things up! Not boring is a spectacular fire on an amusement park roller coaster later in the film that must be seen to be believed! Join us at Cinecon 55’s opening night for this comic satire of manners and morals as maestro Scott Lasky leads the Famous Players Orchestra in a live orchestral accompaniment that will have you dancing the Charleston in your Egyptian Theatre seat!

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THE GLASS WALL (1953, Columbia Pictures)
Courtesy of Sony Pictures

The glass wall of the title refers to the ultra-modern United Nations building in Manhattan, completed just a year before this movie was shot. The story is a nail-biting race-against-time drama. An escapee from war-ravaged Europe who was a 10-year victim of the concentration camps (Italian actor Vittorio Gassman) is caught as a stowaway on a ship in the New York Harbor. He escapes custody and must find the former soldier – known only as “Tom” - who can vouch for him and keep him from being deported back to Europe and almost certain death. And… he has only a few hours to do it! With beautiful location photography of 1950’s New York, Gloria Grahame, and Jazz great Jack Teagarden, what else could you ask for?

Please join us and Cinecon’s special guest Ann Robinson (The War of the Worlds) as we screen THE GLASS WALL which features her in one of her favorite roles. This year Ann Robinson will be honored with the Cinecon Legacy Award.

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FOR HEAVEN'S SAKE (1950, 20th Century Fox)
Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

It’s none of my business either way what you believe but in the world of this comic fantasy movie, life begins before conception! Waiting in a netherworld near heaven is a little girl named Item, played by Gigi Perreau. Item is an unborn child waiting for the couple she chose to be her parents, to finally have a baby. She’s been waiting seven years. The trouble is, the couple, (Joan Bennett and Robert Cummings) are “theater people” and they have put off having a family for the sake of Show Business (I’m sure no one in the Cinecon audience will identify with that!). And now the marriage is getting a little rocky. To help the little girl, two angels, Charles and Arthur (Clifton Webb and Edmund Gwenn) come down to Earth to help persuade the couple to fall back in love again. Down on Earth, taking a cue from a Gary Cooper movie, Charles disguises himself as a wealthy cowboy – Yes, I’m sure we all picture Clifton Webb as a crusty cowboy. Gives a new meaning to the expression “gay caballero!” Anyway, Arthur as the wealthy cowboy, somehow becomes the backer of the couple’s new theatrical show, an “Angel” as it were… and then the IRS shows up!

Directed by George Seaton who directed Edmund Gwenn in MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET. With Joan Blondell, Harry Von Zell, Jack La Rue and Tommy Rettig.

This year Cinecon will be honoring Gigi Perreau – “Item” herself - with the Cinecon Legacy Award during our Classic Film Festival.

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OH MEN! OH WOMEN! (1957, 20th Century Fox)
Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

A top-notch cast: David Niven, Ginger Rogers, Dan Dailey, Cinecon Special Guest Barbara Rush and Tony Randall (in his first film role) headline this comedy written and directed by Nunnally Johnson. Based on a stage play that exploited the still-novel subject of psychoanalysis. David Niven is New York Psychiatrist Dr. Alan Coles who is about to marry Myra (the beautiful Barbara Rush) but suddenly everyone in the city - including his male patients and the husbands of his female patients - seem to have dated Myra at one time or another. Is he the one going out of his mind?

Barbara Rush is being honored this year with the Cinecon Legacy Award. Join us for this screening with actress Barbara Rush in the audience!

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WORLD PREMIERE OF UNIVERSAL’S NEW RESTORATION!

THE DELICIOUS LITTLE DEVIL (1919, Universal Pictures)
Courtesy of Universal Pictures

This silent comedy was produced by actress and former Follies star Mae Murray and her husband, director Robert Z. Leonard. It features Rudolph Valentino in a supporting role as the son of a millionaire… and the romantic apple of Mae Murray’s eye. Meanwhile Mae is a well-bred, but struggling, young woman supporting her parents. When she loses her menial job as a coat-check girl (having been caught wearing one of the coats) she makes up a sordid background for herself so that a nightclub owner will hire her as an exotic dancer. (The ad she saw read: “A Good Future for a Girl with a Past!”) She tells him that she is the former lover of a notorious Duke. Then the actual Duke shows up!

Universal Pictures has chosen Cinecon to give the world premiere screening of this new restoration of this Valentino feature. We are honored to have been given the distinction.

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ON STAGE EVERYBODY(1945, Universal Pictures)
Courtesy of Universal Pictures

Once again, this year we want to thank our friends and benefactors at the Jack Oakie and Victoria Horne Oakie Charitable Foundation for their generous support of Cinecon.

Hotheaded vaudeville performer Tim Sullivan (Jack Oakie) hates radio with a passion – calling it “the destroyer of vaudeville!” He hates it so much that he’d rather lose his job than appear on a radio program. And so, he loses his position in Fulton’s Follies. To make ends meet he takes a job in a department store. But when he is assigned to the radio department, he loses his temper and destroys the radios, ending up in jail. Later, while he’s with friends listening to the World Series on the radio, Tim becomes seduced by the power of the live broadcast. His daughter (Peggy Ryan) convinces him to develop a weekly radio show that will showcase vaudeville acts. And it will be called ON STAGE EVERYBODY!

With a wonderful cast: Otto Kruger, Julie London, Milburn Stone, Wallace Ford, The King Sisters, Grady Sutton, and many more.

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CINECON 55’S SATURDAY NITRATE FEVER!

NIGHT OF MYSTERY(1937, Paramount Pictures)
Archival nitrate print courtesy of UCLA Film & Television Archive

“Philo Vance
needs a kick in the pance.”
Ogden Nash

Pretty much forgotten by the general public now, in the 1930’s and 40’s Philo Vance was a household name. The detective star of a series of 12 best-selling mystery novels written by S.S. Van Dine (pen name of avant-garde art critic Willard Huntington Wright) Philo Vance went on to appear in over a dozen movies where he was portrayed by such luminaries as William Powell, Basil Rathbone, Warren William and Edmund Lowe among others. Here, in NIGHT OF MYSTERY, the second filmed version of the third Vance novel “The Greene Murder Case,” Grant Richards plays him.

Vance finds himself embroiled in the case of the wealthy Greene family who, to follow the dictates of their father’s will, must continue to live in the Greene family mansion. The operative word here is “live,” because while in the house they keep getting bumped off, one by one. With Roscoe Karnes and look for Ellen Drew in a small part.

To be projected in glorious black and white nitrocellulose film! And accompanied by the Fleischer brothers creepy cartoon COBWEB HOTEL (1936) in color nitrate! Also, courtesy of UCLA Film & Television Archive.

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ON THE AVENUE (1937, 20th Century Fox)
Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

A singing, dancing screwball comedy! This movie seems to have everything! Songs by Irving Berlin and a wonderful cast: Alice Faye (Cinecon President Stan Taffel’s “crush”), Dick Powell, Madeleine Carroll, and many of the Cinecon crowd’s favorite character actors: George Barbier, Alan Mowbray, Cora Witherspoon, Billy Gilbert, and more! It even has the Ritz Brothers!

A successful Broadway actor and producer played by Dick Powell writes a sketch for his latest show lampooning a real wealthy New York family, not knowing that the actual family will be in the audience on opening night. The daughter (Madeleine Carroll) sues. But contempt breeds romance…

And… with even more favorite character actors showing up! Walter Catlett, Joan Davis, Stepin Fetchit… even more than we can name here!

Not only all that, but Dick Powell premiers the classic tune, “I’ve got My Love to Keep Me Warm”!

This year we may even show it! (That’s an inside joke for those of you who were in the theater on the last day of Cinecon 54.)

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MILLS OF THE GODS (1934, Columbia)
Courtesy of Sony Pictures

“The mills of the gods grind slowly, but they grind exceedingly fine.” (Justice may be slow, but it will come eventually.) Sextus Empiricus as translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

In the 40 years since her husband passed away Mary Hastings (May Robson) has built her husband’s small blacksmith shop into a major industrial business. A job-well-done, she retires. But the stock market crash in 1929 threatens the plant with financial ruin and puts Mary’s long-time employees at risk. She turns to her children for help, but they are spoiled and greedy. Labor organizers threaten a strike. Co-starring Fay Wray and Victor Jory. Directed by Roy William Neill.

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QUIET PLEASE: MURDER (1942, 20th Century Fox)
Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

In this film, speaking aloud and late fees aren’t the only crimes happening in the Public Library! Erstwhile cad George Sanders is in his element as an oily, egocentric criminal, stealing a one-of- kind and priceless folio of Shakespeare’s Hamlet from the files of the public library, forging copies and selling them to unscrupulous collectors. Keeping up with him in dastardly deeds is the lovely Gail Patrick as his ice-cold sidekick. On the good-guy’s side are private detective Richard Denning and librarian Lynne Roberts. There are twists and double-crosses aplenty. And, this being 1942, of course Nazis get involved. Charming and campy.

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ALOMA OF THE SOUTH SEAS (1941, Paramount Pictures)
Courtesy of Universal Pictures

Jon Hall and Dorothy Lamour both found stardom after appearing in John Ford’s South Sea Island adventure THE HURRICANE (1937). Afterwards Hall became well known for a series of Technicolor Polynesian romances he made with actress Maria Montez. In this movie he teams up again with Dorothy Lamour in a very similar production. ALOMA OF THE SOUTH SEAS, is based on a 1925 Broadway play and is a remake of the 1926 silent film version of the play. Here Hall is Prince Tanoa son of the king of the island, and Lamour is the title character, Aloma. Arranged to be married by their parents when they were small children, they grow up despising each other. Tanoa is sent to be educated in America, not returning until 15 years later to take over leadership of the island after his father’s death. But he finds that his cousin is plotting an armed revolution and plans to overthrow Tanoa and crown himself king.

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DANGER - LOVE AT WORK (1937, 20th Century Fox)
Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

An effervescent screwball comedy - a forgotten gem - directed by … Otto Preminger? Jack Haley (2 years before “The Wizard of Oz”) is a none-too-successful lawyer who gets involved with a screwy family: Mary Boland as the flighty mother; John Carradine, the artist brother; Walter Catlett, the Uncle; and Ann Southern, the daughter, engaged to Edward Everett Horton (!) until Haley does something about it. Featuring a mob of Cinecon favorite character actors: Elisha Cook Jr., E.E. Clive, George Chandler, Franklin Pangborn, and …Charles Lane.

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BURGLAR BY PROXY (1919, Jack Pickford Productions)
Preserved by The Library of Congress

In this silent comedy, starring Mary Pickford’s younger brother and produced by his own production company, Jack Pickford plays the role he was best known for: the nice boy-next-door. Here he is madly in love with Gloria Hope whom he meets accidentally one night because of a toothache and a flat tire. When important papers are stolen from Gloria’s father’s safe, Jack is accused of the theft by a rival suitor. He goes undercover to discover the real thief and finds that the neighborhood is literally crawling with burglars. Practically every house has one to call its own! The burglars take Jack in as one of their own until they become disappointed by his “shoddy workmanship.” Written, Directed and Co-starring (as Spider Kelly, the lead burglar) John Francis (Jack) Dillon.

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TRICK FOR TRICK (1933, Paramount Pictures)
Print courtesy The Museum of Modern Art, New York

With magical special effects by the great William Cameron Menzies, this zany pre-code (and somewhat confusing) mystery comedy is a delight! A battle of magic and wits overwhelm a midnight séance as two powerful magicians (Ralph Morgan and Victor Jory) accuse each other of the murder of an assistant who worked for each of them. Co-starring Sally Blaine and (in a “small” role) Angelo Rossitto!

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THE SHAMROCK HANDICAP (1926, Fox Picture Corp.)
Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

A silent film directed by the great John Ford, it partly takes place in Ford’s beloved Ireland and is set in the world of steeplechase horse racing. When Irish landowner Sir Miles Gaffney (Louis Payne) finds himself in financial trouble he has to sell his stable of racehorses to a wealthy American, Orville Finch (Willard Louis) who takes the horses back to America. Finch also takes Sir Miles’ trainer and jockey Neil Ross (Leslie Fenton) with him, promising that America is a land of opportunity. Neil goes reluctantly because he is in love with Sir Miles’ daughter Sheila (Janet Gaynor). Once in America things don’t go well for Neil so Sheila and her father sail to America with their prize filly “Dark Rosaline” in tow, hoping to win The Shamrock Handicap.

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CHILDREN OF THE WHIRLWIND (1925, Whitman Bennett Productions)
Preserved by The Library of Congress

This silent 1925 crime drama was based on a popular 1921 novel by novelist/screenwriter Leroy Scott. It stars Lionel Barrymore and Johnnie Walker as convicts on parole from Sing Sing Prison. When Walker decides to go straight after getting released his old gang accuses him of being a traitor and they set out to get revenge. Meanwhile, Lionel Barrymore, father of Johnnie’s “girl,” sets out to get revenge of his own on the gang.

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THE STRANGER FROM TEXAS (1939, Columbia Pictures)
Courtesy of Sony Pictures

“A Song-filled Saga of the West!”

Charles Starrett (before he starred in The Durango Kid series) stars here as an undercover U.S. Marshall sent to the town of Buffalo Springs to investigate a case of cattle rustling. There he discovers that the main suspect is… his own father! With the great Bob Nolan and The Sons of the Pioneers in tow - disguised as his ranch hands - Starrett roots out the real cattle thieves. This hour-long oater is full of twists, turns and songs! Including the classic “Tumbling Tumbleweeds.” With past Cinecon guest Lorna Gray.

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CROOKED STREETS (1920, Famous Players Lasky)
Preserved by The Library of Congress

There are crooked streets both in San Francisco and in Shanghai! In this silent spy drama Ethel Clayton (in one of her few surviving films) plays Gail Ellis, secretary to Professor and Mrs. Griswold, who take her with them on a trip to China where they tell her they plan to purchase rare ceramic vases and import them back to America. Actually, the pair are crooks and the vases are filled with opium which is to be smuggled into San Francisco. When Gail finds herself trapped down a dark Shanghai street by a drunken sailor it’s dashing Jack Holt to the rescue!

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DR. RENAULT'S SECRET (1942, 20th Century Fox)
Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

This year’s Cinecon Friday Night Creature Feature gives us a chance to see what 20th Century Fox would do when they ventured into Universal Monster Movie territory. Marvelous character actor J. Carrol Naish – “the B-movie Paul Muni” – who made a career of playing “ethnics” (including many years on radio as the lovable Italian immigrant in “Life with Luigi,”) here plays the ultimate “foreigner.” Just where did Dr. Renault’s assistant Noel come from? And what kind of accent is that? The answer is literally Dr. Renault’s Secret! British actor George Zucco plays Dr. Renault – so you know he’s up to no good! Adapted from a story by Gaston Leroux, author of “The Phantom of the Opera.” For half a century this movie was nearly impossible to see. Here now is a rare chance to see it on the big screen!

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SHOW GIRL (1928, First National)
Courtesy of Warner Bros

SHOW GIRL is one of the last films restored by Cinecon friend - and founder of The Vitaphone Project – the late Ron Hutchinson, before his untimely death earlier this year. SHOW GIRL was considered a “lost film” with only the Vitaphone soundtrack disc surviving… until a print was found in an Italian film archive in 2015.

The comedy/drama stars Alice White as Dixie Dugan, a Brooklyn “cutie” and the lead character in J.P. McAvoy’s popular Dixie Dugan novels. Dixie is a wannabe actress who uses her feminine wiles to persuade a talent agent to give her a chance. The agent teams her up in a nightclub act with criminal-minded Alvarez Romano who stabs a rich “patron of the arts” who is interested in Dixie, and then Romano kidnaps Dixie. More intrigue with a newspaper reporter follows until Dixie is freed and all ends well.

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COME ACROSS (1929, Universal Pictures)
Courtesy of Universal Pictures

COME ACROSS was thought for many years to be a lost film.

In a seedy New York night club -The Sphinx Club – a Montana millionaire is being swindled by the club’s owner and his gang of miscreants. Dancing in the club, as an entertainer, is Mary, a wealthy society girl from Long Island, who is “slumming it,” looking for adventure and attempting to find out how the “other half” lives. Mary gets swept up in the scheme when she falls for one of the club’s crooked employees, a handsome boy named Harry. But not everything is as it seems…

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GET HEP TO LOVE (1942, Universal Pictures)
Courtesy of Universal Pictures

“A SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION OF JUVENILE JIVE!”

Gloria Jean and Donald O’Connor lead the cast in this jitterbugging ‘40’s teen flick. Gloria Jean is Doris Stanley, the exhausted child singer driven to the brink by her greedy and money-grubbing aunt. She’s really a teenager, but her aunt promotes her as an 11-year-old prodigy. Desperately needing a vacation Doris runs away to a small town, changes her name, is adopted by a young couple (Jane Frazee and Robert Paige) and starts high school. There she sets her eye on Jimmy Arnold (Donald O’Connor), but Jimmy is infatuated with pretty Elaine (Cora Sue Collins) who has a string of boys after her. Meanwhile the aunt has sent a private detective to find Doris. And the high school music teacher has noticed what a fine singer Doris is…

Join us for this fun and rollicking film when “Elaine” herself – Cora Sue Collins (2018 Cinecon Legacy Award honoree) - joins us at Cinecon as our special guest!

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WHARF ANGEL (1934, Paramount Pictures)
Courtesy of Universal Pictures

Upstairs of the fog-shrouded Mother Bright’s Saloon – the nastiest, dirtiest roughest tavern on the Barbary Coast – are rooms that contain a “certain kind of woman” held for the entertainment of sailors on leave – THIS IS A PRE-CODE! One night, escaping from the cops for a murder he didn’t commit, Como Murphy (Preston Foster sans his famous mustache) runs up the stairs and bursts through the wrong door. Instead of the roof he finds himself in the room of a young woman with the suggestive name of Toy (Dorothy Dell). With a heart-of-gold she hides him for the night. They fall in love. Downstairs in the bar Turk (Victor McLaglen) holds court. Wanting to keep Toy safe, Como gets a position on a ship sailing to China, working alongside the lumbering Turk. Soon the two become fast friends. They compare notes, telling each other of “the sweetest woman” they each plan to marry. They don’t realize that they are both talking about Toy and are both in love with the same woman until they return to San Francisco. Acts of loyalty and treachery ensue! Directed by William Cameron Menzies.

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CHATTERBOX (1943, Republic Pictures)
Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

Having watched all of Roy Rogers’ pictures, radio cowboy star Rex Vane (Joe E. Brown) is sure he can be a cowboy movie star of the same caliber, despite never having been anywhere West and never having been on a horse. A movie studio executive agrees (when it comes to knowing what the movie-going audience wants, “Nobody knows anything,” as Oscar-winning screenwriter William Goldman famously said). The executive - “B.O.” (probably doesn’t stand for “Box Office”) - sends Rex to a dude ranch out West for some publicity photos. When a photo shoot goes horribly wrong Rex is saved by the amazingly strong ranch hand, Judy Boggs (the yodeling, hillbilly actress Judy Canova). After the bad publicity Rex Vane’s radio show is cancelled, but “B.O.” demands that the studio go ahead with the movie anyway. But he insists that Judy is hired on as Rex’s leading lady (and bodyguard). With the Mills Brothers and western swing music star (and drug addict and convicted murderer) Spade Cooley.

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HIT PARADE OF 1941 (1940 surprisingly!, Republic Pictures)
Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

A fantastic cast of musical performers headline this film which was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Score (for composer Cy Feuer) and for Best Song (“Who am I?” Music by Jule Styne. Lyrics by Walter Bullock) The Cast: Kenny Baker, Frances Langford, Hugh Hubert, Ann Miller (I sold her 13 pairs of shoes on my first day of working at a shoe store when I moved to New York in 1981. She was doing “Sugar Babies” with Mickey Rooney on Broadway at the time, but I digress…) Patsy Kelly, Mary Boland, Phil Silvers, Emory Parnell.

Also known by the title “Romance and Rhythm” the story concerns a small radio station which is facing financial ruin until a wealthy sponsor agrees to outfit the station with new-fangled television equipment. But in doing so, the sponsor insists that there must be a show featuring the singing and dancing of her daughter. The girl can dance… but she can’t sing!

With Sterling Holloway, Franklin Pangborn and Six Hits and a Miss!

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A WOMAN OF THE WORLD (1925, Paramount Pictures)
Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

It will be interesting to watch this movie after seeing Cinecon’s opening night film BARE KNEES with Scott Lasky and The Famous Players Orchestra. Both BARE KNEES and A WOMAN OF THE WORLD are comedies exploring American morals of the time, when an “exotic” woman of seemingly “loose character” arrives in a small town. In this case it’s Maple Valley, Iowa (I’m from Iowa… there ain’t no such place). In A WOMAN OF THE WORLD it isn’t a flapper who comes into town, but a Vamp, a Countess from Europe played by Pola Negri with a goth-style skull tattooed on her arm and a bejeweled cigarette holder clamped in her teeth. Simply driving into town, she is stopped by the horrified District Attorney and told that they don’t allow her kind of woman in Maple Valley. But she smiles and says that she is going to visit her cousin in town, Sam Poore (Chester Conklin).

Pola Negri and Chester Conklin, cousins? They must be “distant” cousins!

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SPEED TO SPARE (1937, Columbia Pictures)
Courtesy of Sony Pictures

“SPEED DEMONS GRIN AT DESTRUCTION FOR A SINGLE SMILE FROM A BLONDE!”

When you’re a professional race car driver it says something when your friends give you the nick name “Skids.” Reckless driver Skids Brannigan is tearing up the racing circuit with all kinds of hazardous maneuvers putting himself and the other drivers at risk of death and destruction. One of his rivals, champion driver Tommy Morton visits the orphanage where he was raised, bringing gifts to the latest troop of kids. While there he accidentally learns that Skids is his brother and they were separated at birth. He keeps the secret of their relationship to himself but decides to try to get Skids to mend his dangerous ways.

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PRIVATE NURSE (1941, 20th Century Fox)
Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

This film’s A-level cast – Jane Darwell, Brenda Joyce, Sheldon Leonard, etc. – in what is essentially a lower-budget sudsy drama is due to a short-lived experiment announced in the Hollywood Reporter. The article stated that 20th Century Fox would be giving “considerably stronger casts to its lower budget productions…” Brenda Joyce plays out-of-town nurse Mary Malloy (no… not Cinecon friend and author Mary Mallory…), who has to scramble to find a job in New York City after she is stood up at the altar. Jane Darwell is Miss Adams, the senior nurse who takes Mary under her wing.

We will also be featuring these one- and two-reel short subject films

BLONDE'S REVENGE (1926)
Preserved by The Library of Congress
HOLD MY BABY (1925)
Preserved by The Library of Congress
PRINCESS LADY BUG(1930)
Preserved by The Library of Congress
THE FROG POND (1938)
Courtesy of Sony Pictures
JIGGERS, MY WIFE (1946)
Courtesy of Sony Pictures
ROOM MATES (1933)
Courtesy of Universal Pictures

As always films are listed here pending final clearance and are subject to change.

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